What Is The Epidemiology Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The exact cause of diabetes is unknown, but it is believed to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Diabetes is a leading cause of death in the United States and is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and blindness.

The incidence of diabetes is increasing, and it is estimated that by 2050, more than 700 million people will be affected by the disease.

The epidemiology of diabetes is the study of the patterns, causes, and effects of the disease.

The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, and it is estimated that by 2050, more than 700 million people will be affected by the disease.

The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by insulin resistance and a relative deficiency of insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease that can be controlled with diet, exercise, and medication.

However, the number of people with type 2 diabetes is increasing, due in part to the rising prevalence of obesity.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas.

Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes, and it is typically diagnosed in childhood or adolescence.

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that requires lifelong treatment with insulin. The epidemiology of diabetes is complex, and the disease has a significant impact on public health.

In the United States, the total cost of diabetes was estimated to be $245 billion in 2012.

The economic burden of diabetes is expected to continue to grow as the incidence of the disease increases.

In general, rough projections for the US population in 2019 were: 8.7% of the US population, or 28.7 million people of all ages, had diabetes.

Diabetes was diagnosed in 283,000 children and teenagers under the age of 20 (about 35 per 10,000 US teenagers).

The prevalence of diabetes is rising alarmingly in the US. According to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report for 2020, there are expected to be 34.2 million cases of diabetes worldwide.

Diabetes 2021: What percentage of the world has diabetes?

Additionally, diabetes is surprisingly common. As of 2021, 537 million individuals worldwide—or about 10% of all adults aged 20 to 79—were living with diabetes, according to the most recent IDF data.

By 2030 and 2045, this is anticipated to rise to 643 million and 783 million, respectively.

An estimated 537 million adults (20–79 years old) will have diabetes in 2021. By 2030, there will be 643 million diabetics worldwide, and by 2045, there will be 783 million.

What’s the meaning of epidemiology?

Epidemiology is defined as the scientific, systematic, and data-driven study of the distribution (frequency, pattern), determinants (causes, risk factors), and occurrences associated with health in certain populations (neighborhood, school, city, state, country, global).

With around 141 million diabetics, China has the greatest percentage of diabetics in the entire globe.

Risk Factors for Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is more likely to develop in african americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, some Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

American Indians have 2 to 5 times the prevalence of diabetes as whites.

Following non-Hispanic Asians (9.2%) and non-Hispanic whites (7.5%) in order of prevalence of diagnosed diabetes were American Indians/Alaska Natives (14.7%), those of Hispanic ancestry (12.5%), and non-Hispanic blacks (11.7%).

(Appendix Table 3).

ethnic group with the Highest Rate of Diabetes

  • Pacific Islanders and American Indians have the highest rates of diabetes among the 5 racial groups counted in the U.S. Census
  • Diabetes is also more common among African-Americans and Asian-Americans compared to whites.

In 2021, over 10.5 percent of adults worldwide were diabetic; by 2045, this percentage is predicted to reach over 12 percent.

Diabetes, often known as diabetes mellitus, is a set of metabolic diseases marked by persistently elevated blood sugar levels.

The country with the lowest diabetes rate is

Northwestern Europe has the lowest prevalence of diabetes, at around 5% of the population. On the other hand, Polynesia and Micronesia, which are Pacific islands, have about 1 in 4 people who have diabetes.

It is uncertain what causes the majority of diabetes types. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream in every situation. This is as a result of inadequate insulin production by the pancreas.

Diabetes of either type can result from a mix of hereditary and environmental causes.

Is diabetes more common in males or females?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that men are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than women.

However, some data indicates that complications in diabetes may affect women more frequently than they do men.

Between 1990 and 2009, there were 4.4 percent more diabetics than the general population, reaching a peak of 8.2 per 100 adults before plateauing at 8 per 100 adults in 2017.

All age categories, racial and ethnic groups, sexes, and levels of education showed comparable patterns.

Epidemiology of Type 1 Diabetes

The findings of the meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant incidence of type 1 diabetes of 15 cases per 100,000 individuals and a prevalence of 9.5% (95% CI: 0.07 to 0.12) worldwide.

The findings show that type 1 diabetes is becoming more common and more prevalent globally.

Type 2 diabetes is expected to impact 462 million people worldwide, or 6.28% of the world’s population (Table 1). This disorder was the ninth biggest cause of death in 2017, accounting for more than 1 million deaths.

What is epidemiological triad?

The epidemiologic trio, or triangle, the conventional model for infectious disease, is one of the simplest of these. A susceptible host, an external agent, and an environment that combines the host and agent make up the trio.

Diabetes, the seventh most common cause of mortality in the US, is expected to cost $327 billion worldwide in medical expenses, lost productivity, and salaries.

In actuality, the typical medical expenses for those with diabetes are more than twice as high as those for those without the disease.

Diabetes as a Global Health Issue

Diabetes raises the risk of dying young, and its complications can have a negative impact on quality of life. The high prevalence of diabetes around the world has a detrimental economic effect on people, healthcare systems, and countries.

In the US, diabetes is the sixth largest cause of death. Kidney failure, lower limb amputations, and adult blindness are all most commonly brought on by diabetes.

The number of adults with diabetes has more than doubled over the past 20 years.

What is the difference between diabetes and diabetes mellitus?

Diabetes is the more widely used term to refer to diabetes mellitus. It occurs when your pancreas does not create enough insulin to keep your blood sugar and glucose levels under control.

The findings of the meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant incidence of type 1 diabetes of 15 cases per 100,000 individuals and a prevalence of 9.5% (95% CI: 0.07 to 0.12) worldwide.

The findings show that type 1 diabetes is becoming more common and more prevalent globally.

Epidemiology of Diabetes in USA and Worldwide

Type 2 diabetes is expected to impact 462 million people worldwide, or 6.28% of the world’s population (Table 1). This disorder was the ninth biggest cause of death in 2017, accounting for more than 1 million deaths.

Although the mortality rate from diabetes is increasing across the board for all racial and socioeconomic groups, complications and higher death rates are more common among minorities and low-income groups, which exacerbates health inequities.

Diabetes is widespread. This description is necessary due to the disease’s high and rising prevalence.

What is the epidemiology of hypertension?

Key conclusions Age-adjusted hypertension was more common in adults during the survey period of 2017–2018 (45.4%) and was more prevalent in males (51.0%) than in females (39.7%).

Age-related increases in hypertension were: 22.4% (aged 18–39), 54.5% (aged 40–59), and 74.5%. (60 and over).

The conclusion

In the US, the prevalence of diabetes is rising dramatically. In 2019, diabetes was found in 283,000 kids and teens under the age of 20.

African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, some Asian Americans, and other Pacific Islanders are more prone to developing type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is more frequently diagnosed in men than in women. 6.28% of the world’s population, or 462 million individuals, are predicted to have type 2 diabetes.

More than 1 million people died from diabetes in 2017, making it the tenth leading cause of mortality. Diabetes is the sixth-leading cause of death in the US.

Diabetes is most frequently associated with adult blindness, kidney failure, and lower limb amputations. 6.28% of the world’s population, or 462 million individuals, are predicted to have type 2 diabetes.

Sources

https://diabetesresearch.org/diabetes-statistics/
https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics-report/diagnosed-diabetes.html
https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/diabetes-rates-by-country

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