Can A Low-carb Diet Cause Heart Problems

A low-carb diet is a great way to lose weight, but there are some potential risks associated with it.

One of the most serious risks is heart problems. A low-carb diet can cause high blood pressure and cholesterol, which can lead to heart disease.

If you have any concerns about your heart health, talk to your doctor before starting a low-carb diet.

But many medical professionals caution against low-carb diets. They cite extensive population studies showing a connection between low-carb diets and an elevated risk of heart attack, stroke, and early demise.

According to a New York cardiologist, the keto diet is founded on false information, and he would never advise any patient to follow it.

One well-known New York cardiologist has called the keto diet “a folly” that prevents individuals from consuming nutritious meals.

Low-Carb Diets and Arteries

Some of the first information on this topic is now provided by a study led by a team of Harvard scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), which found that mice fed a low-carbohydrate/high-protein diet for 12 weeks developed atherosclerosis, or the buildup of plaque in the arteries of the heart.

According to the published review, those who consume a ketogenic diet are far more likely to have heart disease, LDL cholesterol buildup, kidney failure, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cancer.

What diet is best for heart patients?

Consume more fruits and vegetables. Like other fruits or plant-based diets, fruits and vegetables contain compounds that may lower the risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

You may be able to reduce your intake of high-calorie meals like meat, cheese, and snack foods by increasing your intake of fruits and vegetables.

The negative effects of a Low-Carb Diet

  • Fatigue. Fatigue is a common symptom of low-carb diets because carbohydrates are the body’s preferred fuel source
  • Headaches. If you are lowering carbs, you will also be reducing your sugar intake
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Bad Breath
  • Weight Gain
  • Bloating
  • Fatigue and Irritability.

Can Keto Reverse Clogged Arteries?

High-fat or “ketogenic” diets may entirely avoid, or even reverse, heart failure brought on by a metabolic process, according to research from Saint Louis University.

You may manage how much fat and cholesterol you ingest over time by being mindful of how much and what kinds of food you consume.

Therefore, reducing plaque formation, which can lead to fatal coronary heart disease, is possible with intermittent fasting.

Who should not do keto?

People with kidney damage, those at risk for heart disease, women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, those with type 1 diabetes, those with pre-existing liver or pancreatic conditions, and anyone who has had their gallbladder removed shouldn’t try the keto diet due to these hazards.

Typically, foods that clog arteries are heavy in cholesterol and saturated fats. Additionally, they could be high in sugar and simple carbohydrates like white bread.

The combination of foods, rather than just one kind, is typically what has a bad effect on arterial and heart health.

However, if you start consuming more saturated fat due to becoming keto, your LDL will probably increase. It “has been proved over and over again” that increasing saturated fat intake raises LDL.

While some organs may adapt to a diet devoid of carbohydrates, others cannot. Because carbohydrates are the simplest source of glucose for your body, they should be a part of your diet.

Having said that, if you are consuming enough calories each day, you can reduce or eliminate your carbohydrate intake.

Can keto cause heart arrhythmia?

But when someone enters ketosis for the first time, they may feel some symptoms and get concerned. Some signs include a headache, exhaustion from exercising, and palpitations or an elevated heartbeat.

The shortage of salt and water in your body is what is causing these heart palpitations.

Your LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels rise as a result of these fats, while your HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels decline. According to the American Heart Association, they also increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

The Effects of a Low-Carb Diet on Arteries

An analysis of all the greatest research to date indicated that low-carb diets impair arterial function as evidenced by a decrease in flow-mediated dilatation, indicating that low-carb diets really stiffen people’s arteries.

We now have studies that evaluate the effects of low carb diets on arteries directly.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 45% to 65% of daily calories should come from carbs. Therefore, if you consume 2,000 calories per day, 900 to 1,300 of those calories should come from carbohydrates.

Are low-carb diets safe long term?

Current evidence indicates that low-carb diets may raise your risk of total mortality as well as dying from heart disease, stroke, and cancer in the long run, despite the fact that they have been proven to be successful for short-term weight loss and even blood sugar control.

Both diets can be sensible choices when comparing low-carb vs. keto for overall health. However, keto is more of a certainty for weight loss than low-carb in terms of fat loss.

And even if you consume 100 net grams of carbohydrates each day, that quantity may cause you to exit ketosis.

Carbohydrate Intake for Heart Patients

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 45% to 65% of daily calories should come from carbs. Therefore, if you consume 2,000 calories per day, 900 to 1,300 of those calories should come from carbohydrates.

Current evidence indicates that low-carb diets may raise your risk of total mortality as well as dying from heart disease, stroke, and cancer in the long run, despite the fact that they have been proven to be successful for short-term weight loss and even blood sugar control.

The conclusion

According to studies from Saint Louis University, ketogenic diets may be used to either prevent or treat heart failure. The keto diet, according to one cardiologist, is “a folly” that discourages individuals from eating a balanced diet.

Some organs can adjust to a low-carb diet, but others cannot. You can cut back on or stop eating carbohydrates if you are getting adequate calories each day.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that between 45% and 65% of daily calories come from carbohydrates.

Sources

https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/could-a-low-carb-diet-help-your-heart
https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2009/08/low-carb-diets-linked-to-atherosclerosis-and-impaired-blood-vessel-growth/
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/keto-diet-and-heart-disease/

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